Last Day in PA!

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The whale tail statue which greats visitors on the dock

 

Today was a busy day of setting up the labs and tracking down the rest of the equipment. In the labs we are starting to tie things down, so that when the ship is rocking and rolling in the waves all of the equipment will stay safely on the tables. We also moved into our cabins! Always exciting setting up your home away from home. The cabins on the Palmer are all really nice, they even have windows! That may sound super obvious, but many research vessels have the cabins below the water line, and so without any windows.

Less exciting, but still important, was safety and IT training. For two hours we learned about keeping safe aboard the ship, staying in keeping with coast guard regulations, and being conservative with the very limited internet resources in Antarctica. The highlights of training were trying on the gumby survival suits (emergency neoprene hoodie-footies that make you look like the clay-mation character Gumby), and exploring the inside of the emergency escape vehicle. On the subject of limited internet – please don’t be offended if your comments don’t appear right away – we love getting comments, but may not be able to spam check them all once our internet connectivity is minimal.

Parked at the same dock as us today are two ships a Brazilian Antarctic Research Vessel and  the Stella Australis – a cruise ship taking tourists around Patagonia.

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Stella Australis – even a brief glance shows how different a tourist ship is from a sience ship.

 

This evening we went for one last walk to stretch our legs on shore. We made sure to stop in the central square, and rub the toe of the noble savage seated at the base of the monument to Sir Frances Drake. Rubbing (or kissing) the statue’s toe is traditionally said to bring good weather on the Crossing of the Drake Passage.

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Sir Francis Drake’s statue atop his podium – notice how shiny the toe of the noble savage is

 

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